Samuel Yeaman

Assistant Professor; AIHS Chair in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Department of Biological Sciences

PhD

University of British Columbia, 2010

BSc

Trent University, 2003

Contact information

Phone

Office: 403.220.6126

Web presence

Website

Location

Office : BI394

Courses

  • BIOL 530A - Honours Research Project in Biological Sciences    
  • BIOL 401 - Evolutionary Biology    
  • BIOL 530B - Honours Research Project in Biological Sciences    
  • ECOL 501 - Ecological and Evolutionary Applications

Research and teaching

Research interests

Natural environments are highly variable and biological constraints often prevent a single individual from performing best in all conditions. Specialization through genetic adaptation to the local environment provides one way to cope with a heterogeneous environment, and has been observed in a wide range of species, from lodgepole pine to threespine stickleback.

My research aims to understand how organisms adapt to both spatially and temporally heterogeneous environments and how this process shapes the genetic and genomic architecture of complex traits. I use a combination of population genetic theory and individual-based simulations to formulate hypotheses, and seek to test these hypotheses using comparative genomics and studies of genomic variation in natural populations. Understanding how evolution shapes the genomic basis of complex traits has important implications for medicine, personalized genomics, and predicting the response of natural populations to climate change.

Specific Research Projects:

  • Genome rearrangements and the evolution of clustered architectures in threespine stickleback (through de novo assembly of outgroup species)
  • Comparative genomics of clustered architectures in Eukaryotes
  • Genomic signatures of adaptation: disentangling signatures of selection from background variation
  • Comparative genomics of local adaptation to climate in lodgepole pine and interior spruce

I am very interested in a range of related problems, including:

  • The mapping of genotype to phenotype and genetic modularity and redundancy
  • Comparative genomics of adaptation and convergent vs. divergent responses to similar ecological challenges
  • Visualization of complex patterns in high-dimensionality genomic data
  • Maintenance of genetic variation within populations
  • Cultural evolution and the maintenance of misinformation

Publications

Google Scholar


Awards

  • Canadian Society for Ecology and Evolution Early Career Award (2015)
  • AIHS Chair in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (2015-2022)