Recent Research Chairs in the Faculty of Science

Chris Clarkson

Chris Clarkson

Professor
Recent AITF Shell/Encana Chair in Unconventional Gas and Light Oil Research
(2015 – 2020)
Geoscience

Dr. Clarkson’s research interests include reservoir and hydraulic fracture characterization of unconventional gas and light oil reservoirs in the field and in the laboratory, and evaluation of gas injection enhanced oil recovery and greenhouse gas storage in unconventional light oil reservoirs in the field and in the laboratory.

Clarkson’s primary areas of research are summarized as follows:

  1. Advancement of Rate-Transient (Production Data)/Analysis Methods for Unconventional Gas (UG)/Light Oil Reservoirs (ULO)
  2. Advanced Reservoir Characterization Using Core and Cuttings Data from UG/ULO Reservoirs.
  3. Simulation of Primary and Enhanced Recovery in UG/ULO Reservoirs in the laboratory and in the field.

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Darren Derksen

Associate Professor
Recent Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation Junior Chair in Medicinal Chemistry
(2014 – 2019)
Chemistry

Dr. Derksen's research is in the area of medicinal and synthetic organic chemistry applied to biologically active compounds. By developing inhibitors and protein degraders, the Derksen group is interested in targets related to the treatment of cancer and pain. This research program has a focus on addressing stereochemical challenges, minimizing the use of protecting groups, and minimizing the number of total steps through innovative development of synthetic methodology. Working with partners in ACHRI, HBI, and the Charbonneau Cancer Institute, compounds are tested and evaluated for their potential to make real-world impact.  View contact information.

 

Darren Derksen

David Eaton

David Eaton

Professor
Recent NSERC/Chevron Industrial Research Chair in Microseismic System Dynamics
(2015 – 2020)
Geoscience

Dr. Eaton’s group are using borehole and surface geophone systems for microseismic monitoring. They are developing innovative approaches to process and interpret microseismic data, including integration with geomechanical modelling. These studies are providing operators with improved methods to optimize hydraulic fracture design and incorporate microseismic observations into reservoir models.  The group is also making use of passive seismic observations and computer simulations to better understand risks from induced seismicity due to hydraulic fracturing and wastewater injection. This work includes field observations with broadband seismograph observatories, coupled with development of improved numerical models for triggered fault slip. Research by Dr. Eaton’s group and collaborators is providing fundamental new insights into the nature of microseismic deformation - especially the expression of tensile crack opening, as well as the response of natural fracture systems to changes in stress and fluid conditions.  View contact information.


Philip Fong

Associate Professor
Recent NSERC CRC II in Software Security
(2009 – 2019)

Computer Science

Philip Fong’s research interests include access control, security and privacy for Internet of Things (IoT), protection technologies for social computing, and language-based security.  View contact information.

Philip Fong

Dae-Kyun Ro

Dae-Kyun Ro

Professor
Recent NSERC CRC II in Plant Bioproducts
(2006 – 2016)
Biological Sciences

Dr. Ro’s research focuses on metabolic and chemical biology in plants and microbes. Our society is heavily dependent on the cost-effective and sustainable supplies of pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, industrial chemicals, and bio-fuels, derived from various plants and microbes. In-depth understanding of their biosynthesis and regulation in native hosts, together with synthetic metabolic redesign in heterologous organisms, can allow us to produce a diverse array of chemicals for human health and industrial uses. However, biosynthetic mechanism and metabolic regulation of many naturally occurring chemicals are still not fully understood. We use interdisciplinary and integrative research approaches, such as molecular genetics, biochemical, cell biological, and genomics tools, to advance our knowledge of metabolic and chemical biology in plants and microbes. 

Specific research activities in Dr. Ro’s lab are as follows:
1. Chemical diversity and evolution of sesquiterpene lactone in lettuce, sunflower, and related Asteraceae (Compositae) plants. 
2. Natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce (Latuca sativa)
3. Comparative genomics of proanthcyanidin biosynthesis in pea (Pisum sativum) and Arabidopsis.
4. Functional transcriptomics of medicinal plants and implementation of synthetic metabolism in microbe and plant by various biotechnological tools.

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Gregory Welch

Associate Professor
Recent NSERC CRC II in Solar Energy Materials and Devices
(2015 – 2020; previously at Dalhousie University 2012 - 2015)
Chemistry

The Welch research group is a chemistry-centric research group working on the development and understanding of sustainable materials for energy health, and the environment. They are currently focused on the design and synthesis of organic and organic/inorganic hybrid functional materials for use in printed electronics, specifically, organic photovoltaics (PVs) field-effect transistors (FETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and the integration of these materials into electronic devices. The lab puts an emphasis on applying green chemistry principles to the design, synthesis, and processing of functional materials. The team operates following a lab-to-fab model and translates small scale discoveries to real world applications. Innovative technologies emerging from the lab include indoor light recycling devices, flexible strip lighting for signage and safety, and low-cost sensors for health and food security applications. View contact information.

Gregory Welch